For a healthier lifestyle, change your way of thinking

By Pete Pfeffer

River rocks in shape of yin yang symbolIn July, I had the privilege to travel to British Columbia where I spent three days in class with other health professionals. We were enrolled in Dr. James Chestnut’s Lifestyle Camp, where we tackled the question, “How does what we think, how we move and how we eat affect our overall health and vitality?”
We met every morning at 6 a.m. and took a brisk 30-minute hike through mountain trails. This act alone has been shown to reduce the risk of cancer and diabetes by upwards of 75 percent.
We returned for an intense, body-weight-only work out following the principles of “moving well.” This satisfied the human genetic requirement for regular proper movement of our spine and extremities.
A breakfast of organic fruits and vegetables and locally-grown organic eggs and lamb sausage followed. Next came three hours of lecture pertaining to the topics of thinking,
moving or eating well.
This was followed by a light lunch consisting of locally-grown organic vegetables and meats. An afternoon field trip coordinated a physical activity that supported the morning lecture.
We returned to amazing dinners, again consisting of fresh locally-grown vegetables and a choice of wild salmon, bison or chicken. Following dinner, we had discussions that went as late as the day’s topic required.
I wanted to set the table to illustrate the environment that taught me some fundamental wellness principles. I feel compelled to share these as summer draws to a close and many of us reorganize for fall.
The major premise I was exposed to is that we are genetically designed to live nearly 120 years. We are tossed into the “swimming pool” of life with an empty backpack and pair of inflatable water wings that should keep us afloat for those 120 years.
Unfortunately, our lifestyle choices, either conscious or unconscious, put rocks in our backpacks and squeeze air from our wings. The way we think, what we choose to eat, and how we move (or don’t

 

 

move) can add or subtract
years from our life.
Here are some affirmative statements that anchored healthy changes in me that may be useful to you, too:
“I choose thought patterns that are genetically congruent with health.”
“I think thoughts that are loving, optimistic, confident, content, successful, forgiving and healthy.”
“I choose genetically congruent foods. I eat ‘fresh fiber’ first at each meal and choose foods that remove rocks from my backpack, extending and improving my life.”
“I move well and often. I expend energy in ways genetically congruent with my frame that support my cells and tissues. I perform strength, power, agility, stability, flexibility and balance exercises several times a week.”
This pattern of thinking has improved my health and changed my energy levels for the better. I have committed to pull the rocks from my backpack. Won’t you join me?

Peter Pfeffer is a doctor of chiropractic with HealthSource Chiropractic and Progressive Rehab in Alexandria.

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